The popular FX television series “The People v. O.J. Simpson” has managed to reopen old wounds over the carnival of perversion that was so-called trial of the century. When former NFL superstar and celebrity pitchman Orenthal James Simpson aka O.J. aka the Juice was arrested for the gruesome murder of his former wife Nicole and her friend Ron Goldman the drama captivated America and launched the tabloid McNews industry. There was the celebrity factor and thanks to the gaggle of high paid attorneys retained by Simpson known as the “Dream Team”, the race card was invoked early and often and was the key factor in Simpson’s being able to get away with murder.

The trial was a down and dirty witches brew of race-baiting, gross incompetence on the part of L.A. prosecutors and a golden cash cow that launched the media careers of many as well as inexorably changing the way that the media covers celebrity sleaze. While the series remains faithful to the real story this is after all America and there is always the need to be sure that both sides get to be heard even if one is total horseshit.

So now, the incandescently flaming Hollywood Liberal Martin Sheen – Charlie’s daddy – is releasing his own series that looks to make the case that O.J. didn’t do it. CNN reports on what will likely be a ratings blockbuster in the story “Martin Sheen’s ‘O.J. Is Innocent’ series to re-examine case”:

Fans of FX’s show “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson” can thank a former “president” for a new addition to what is becoming a catalog of content based on the now-iconic case.

“Hard Evidence: O.J. Is Innocent,” a true-crime docuseries, will be executive produced and narrated by Martin Sheen, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Sheen, still be beloved for his portrayal of President Josiah “Jed” Bartlet on “The West Wing” from 1999-2006, can lend only his voice to the project because his Netflix contract for its series “Grace and Frankie” doesn’t allow him to appear elsewhere onscreen.

The new series will air on the Investigation Discovery channel and investigate claims that Simpson was responsible for the deaths of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ron Goldman. Simpson was found innocent in the 1995 criminal trial but found liable in a civil case two years later.

“Hard Evidence” will offer an alternative theory and possible new evidence, based on decades of work by William C. Dear, a private investigator who wrote the 2012 book “O.J. Is Innocent and I Can Prove It.”
Sheen said the project will examine “What if there were enough evidence that proved O.J. Simpson did not murder his ex-wife Nicole or Ron Goldman? What if the real killer were still at large? And finally, what if a grand jury convened to reconsider the case based on new evidence?”

Dear, who met Sheen through his son Charlie Sheen, told The Hollywood Reporter that he is excited as to what the series might yield.

“I’m hoping that when we do this series, the evidence should be more than enough to get a grand jury indictment,” he said. “If I accomplish that, I will have accomplished a great deal in my life. I’ve done the best I can, and I’m excited about the fact that finally I can get it out there.”

“Hard Evidence” will air in 2017.

While Simpson was able to avoid a prison sentence for the murders – which he most certainly was involved in – but alas after a number of futile years of hitting the golf courses looking for the “real killers” the Juice ended up in the iron bar hotel anyway. Remember that Al Capone was never convicted for murder but was thrown in the hole anyway so karma can be a real bitch. Mr. Sheen’s series with the inevitable narrative that Simpson was taken down only because he was a successful black man will likely do wonders for race relations which are already in the crapper thanks to the new self-referential militant blacktivism that is sweeping the country.

The bitter legacy of racial animus and Greta Van Susteren weren’t the only culturally toxic byproducts of the O.J. Simpson trial – it also played an integral role in the launching of the careers of the Kardashians.

Advertisements